Explore with us a variety of fermentation methods and open the gates to limitless culinary explorations. Whether we work with vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds or grains, we teach how to collaborate with the kingdoms of bacteria and fungi to create delicious fermented sides, keeping your meals vibrant all year-long.

Introduction to

VEGETABLE FERMENTATION

“Fermenting vegetables is the ideal way to begin a fermentation practice in your life. It is very easy; it can be enjoyed fairly quickly; it is extremely nutritious and beneficial to health; it is delicious and a satisfying accompaniment to any meal; and it is intrisically safe.”

– Sandor E. Katz, The Art of Fermentation.

Vegetable lacto-fermentation is a rich, inspiring, worldwide tradition, that dates to at least 160 BC in the Roman written records. It has evolved from a simple, efficient preservation method to a modern-day health food trend.

Whether brined whole or shredded and salted, fermented vegetables can be adapted to local ingredients and connect us with culinary traditions. Thanks to the beneficial bacteria responsible for the fermentation process, these living foods contain deep and subtle flavours and increased nutritious value.

Get a chance to try out our best vegetable ferments… and learn ways to make some yourself at home!

In this 3-hour beginner workshop, you learn the basics of fermenting with lactic-acid bacteria and discover the specificities of both dry-salting and brining techniques. Tips and sharing of experiences are coupled with hands-on practice. Seasoned fermentistas also enjoy this workshop as a refresher, with lots of opportunities for inspiration and troubleshooting.

Participants bring their own knife – everything else is included.

  • variety of samples
  • health + practical benefits
  • troubleshooting on fermentation set-ups +  ingredients
  • use of fermented brine
  • tools + books recommendations
  • handouts + recipes
  • 2 jars of vegetables ready to ferment at home!

KIMCHI

“Kimchi probably most famously hit the world media in 2008 during the outbreak of avian flu. There was no recorded case of the flu in Korea, which was attributed to kimchi consumption. This magical “soul food” of Korea often appears on “super food” lists. It is believed the properties of the combination of garlic and pepper, magnified by fermentation, is what gives kimchi its immune-boosting power.”

– Kirsten K. Shockey & Christopher Shockey, Fermented Vegetables.
Proudly celebrated through Korean family traditions and festivals, kimchi is an integral part of Korean food culture. Trying to make an “authentic” kimchi can be daunting, since the variables are infinite and the craft often calls for techniques and ingredients that are not common or readily accessible in North-America.

After exploring the rich world of kimchi, we settled on a vegetarian version that uses some traditional methods while remaining approachable to new fermentistas.

Come try out our different kinds of kimchis… and discover how to make them yourself at home!

In this 3-hour beginner workshop, you learn everything from kraut-chi to kimchi. We start with the basics of fermenting with lactic-acid bacteria and discover a layering of fermentation processes that involves raw and cooked ingredients. A visual presentation of Korean kimchi culture and how-to demonstrations are coupled with hands-on practice.

Participants bring their own knife – everything else is included.

  • variety of samples
  • health + practical benefits
  • troubleshooting on fermentation methods +  ingredients
  • cooking with kimchi
  • tools + books recommendations
  • handouts + recipes
  • 1 jar of vegetarian kimchi ready to ferment at home!

ADVANCED

Vegetable Fermentation

“No matter how delicious something is, if it’s not easy to prepare at the end of a busy day, it won’t make it on the dinner table. That’s where fermentation comes in: You can make delicious, nutrient-dense fermented vegetables whenever you have the time. Later, when there are no fresh veggies in the crisper drawer, or you don’t have the time to cook up something quick, you’ll have instant side dishes, salads or flavourful foods around which to build a meal. Fermented vegetables are the ultimate convenience food!.”

– Kirsten K. Shockey & Christopher Shockey, Fermented Vegetables.
When it comes to applying fermentation knowledge to daily cooking, it is an invitation to the expert fermentista for a fantastic exploration.

You can create surprising sides by mixing your krauts or pickles with raw ingredients and fermenting them further. And you can build a bold version of your favorite condiment by fermenting its ingredients from scratch. Hot sauces, mustard and relish; apple compote, cranberry chutney and preserved lemons – the variations are endless.

Fermented vegetables are just waiting to be the star of a dish, added towards the end of a preparation to preserve their health benefits or cooked in for added tangy flavours. Not sure how to eat fermented vegetables or in need of a nudge to boost your creativity? Welcome to our “fermented kitchen”!

In this 3-hour advanced master class, you build on the basics of lacto-fermentation to learn how to work with multiple fermentation stages and months-long fermentation processes. We explore how to play with a variety of raw and fermented ingredients to build deeper flavours. We also explore ways to incorporate ferments in meals and preparations. Demonstrations and troubleshooting are the focus of the class.

Everything is included.

  • variety of samples
  • cooking with vegetable ferments
  • lacto-fermented juices
  • troubleshooting on fermentation set-ups +  ingredients
  • double-fermentation
  • tools + books recommendations
  • handouts + recipes
  • 2 jars of fermented pastes ready to ferment at home!

KOMBUCHA

& other fermented drinks

“After all our research, what we think happened is that centuries ago, someone left out a cup of sweetened tea or sweet wine. An insect or two landed in the cup, leaving behind Acetobacter that colonized with some local yeasts and began the very first kombucha ferment”.

– Hannah Crum & Alex LaGory, The Big Book of Kombucha.
Even though the historical records are murky and myths abound, fermentation with mother cultures is at least centuries, if not millennia old. We can enjoy the amazing taste, carbonation and health benefits of kombucha, jun and tibicos thanks to the hard work of their unique Symbiotic Communities of Bacteria and Yeasts (SCOBYs).

Since these different cultures have been passed down generation to generation, it is a pleasure to connect with tradition by keeping and nurturing a “mother” at home! Whether one is using a SCOBY to transform sweet black tea to kombucha, sweet water to Tibicos, or sweet green tea to Jun, these amazing micro-organisms provide delicious effervescent brews bubbling with healthy acids, enzymes and nutrients.

In this 2.5-hour master class, you learn the basics of kombucha brewing, including guidelines for successful second fermentation, during which the fermented liquid is flavored and carbonated. You are also introduced to other mother cultures: jun and tibicos, and learn their specificities. Demonstrations and troubleshooting are the focus of the class.

Everything is included.

  • variety of samples
  • health + practical benefits
  • troubleshooting on ratios, temperature +  ingredients
  • tools + books recommendations
  • handouts + recipes
  • 2 choices of mother cultures to start brewing at home!

GINGER BEER

& other fermented drinks

“My big discovery when working on this book was the fact that brewing is really a continuous, linear activity. We like to chop up this creative line into small, discrete segments and impose etiquettes on them: That’s a beer, that’s a wine, or that’s a soda. But the truth is that humans, since the dawn of time, have been brewing boozy concoctions that often transcend regular labels.”

– Pascal Baudar, The Wildcrafting Brewer.
Fizzy beverages exist thanks to an array of beneficial micro-organisms, with archeological evidence of human use dating back to 7000 BC. Shining the light on the wealth of worldwide traditions of non-alcoholic fermented drinks is enough to make our modern sugar-laden and industrially-processed pops blush. Good news is that one can enjoy homemade fizzy beverages by resorting to these ancient practices of wild fermentation.

Whether one is creating ginger beer or wildcrafted sodas, amazing micro-organisms will provide delicious effervescent brews bubbling with healthy acids, enzymes and nutrients.

In this 2.5-hour master class, you learn how to build and maintain wild yeast cultures to use as a base for fermented drinks. We provide basic instructions for inoculation, and guidelines for successful second fermentation. Apart from the popular ginger beer, we explore how to make sodas with local wildcrafted ingredients. Demonstrations and troubleshooting are the focus of the class.

Everything is included.

  • variety of samples
  • health + practical benefits
  • troubleshooting on ratios, temperature +  ingredients
  • tools + books recommendations
  • handouts + recipes
  • A ginger bug ready to start brewing ginger beer at home!

SOURDOUGH

“It is definitely easier and faster to bake bread using a packet of yeast, but it is a more magical experience to make bread by harnessing the power of wild yeasts and bacteria, and the bread itself – in terms of flavor, crumb, storage potential, and nutrient availability – is far superior.”

– Sandor E. Katz, The Art of Fermentation.
Sourdough baking is a practice thousands of years old, dating back at least to ancient Egypt. It’s only two centuries ago that the use of single, industrially-produced yeasts started to appear. The tradition of using a “sourdough starter” with a mixed community of microorganisms is becoming popular again, and for good reasons.

Bacteria, yeasts and enzymes active in long sourdough fermentation transform complex molecules into simpler forms, rendering them more digestible. Proteins, including gluten, are broken down into peptides and amino acids.

As a result, many people with gluten sensitivities find that sourdough breads cause less or no inflammation. Indeed the widespread consumption of industrially-produced breads and non-fermented wheat products has been linked to the recent rise in wheat allergies.

In this 3-hour workshop, you learn how to build and maintain an ongoing fermented culture, and the principles of inoculation. We demonstrate the 48-hour steps required for a recipe of no-knead bread in cast-iron pot and make a fresh loaf together. Seasoned bakers also enjoy this workshop as a refresher, with lots of opportunities to dive into the theory and ask questions.

Everything is included.

  • variety of samples
  • health + practical benefits
  • troubleshooting on ratios, temperature + humidity
  • tools + books recommendations
  • handouts + recipes
  • An active sourdough to start baking at home!

Dairy-free

CHEESE

“It didn’t take me long to embark on a search for plant-based cheeses that would satisfy my craving. Within a couple of weeks, I tasted every single “vegan” cheese available at local stores, which ended up in a huge disappointment. My quest became an obsession! It seemed that the secret was to use exactly the same techniques for regular and plant-based cheeses. Fermentation was the secret.”

– Pascal Baudar, Wildcrafted Fermentation.
Like many animals, humans around the world have evolved fermenting their proteins, in order to preserve them and increase their digestibility. So it is no surprise that plant-based cheeses (made from seeds that are high in fat and proteins, just like milk), are best fermented.

Industrially-processed patties loaded with gelling agents and starches might have the perfect texture to mimic dairy cheeses, but they will never rival the taste of dairy-free cheeses that are cultured at home.

There are so many different ways to culture nuts, seeds, legumes and their milks to make spreads or hard cheeses that are satisfying, nutritious, flavourful and healthy. Indulge!

In this 2-hour master class, you learn how to make a variety of “fauxmages”, including dairy-free cheesy deserts and dips; aged cakes; fatty sprinkles; and our favourite creamy spreads. We provide basic instructions for inoculation, and guidelines to attain satisfying textures, colours and flavours. We use a variety of cultures and propose nut-free or soy-free options. Demonstrations and troubleshooting are the focus of the class.

Everything is included.

  • variety of samples
  • health + practical benefits
  • troubleshooting on starters, texture +  base ingredients
  • tools + books recommendations
  • handouts + recipes
  • A culture selection to start your dairy-free cheesemaking at home!

TEMPEH

“Many people are disturbed by the notion of eating molds. Yet microscopic molds are inevitably present on much of our food, and certain molds have long traditions of use by people who grow them on foods as a means of processing. In the West, the most familiar mold ferments are cheeses, though molded cheeses do not seem to hold universal appeal. In Asia, molds are used much more widely and have greater acceptance.”

– Sandor E. Katz, The Art of Fermentation.

Tempeh is a fermented soybean cake originating from Indonesia, where it is a staple food. Some speculate that the first tempeh was made when the leftover pressings from making tofu were colonized by molds after being wrapped in hibiscus leaves, where Rhizopus Oryzae naturally grows.

Today, most tempeh available on the market worldwide is still made with soybeans – but any type of legume, seed or grain can be fermented in place of soy. Tempeh is a great way to consume these hard-to digest high-protein foods, with increased nutrients readily available after transformation by the mold.

To maintain a “tropical-like” habitat for successful mold fermentation can be a bit technical, but once you have the right set-up, it becomes unbelievably simple, easy and rewarding to make your own tempeh at home.

In this 2-hour master class, you learn the principles of inoculation, and tips for creating your best tempeh incubator. Step by step instructions, including tempeh at different stages of mycelium growth help understand the process of mold fermentation, along with a presentation of the culinary uses of different types of molds. Demonstrations and troubleshooting are the focus of the class.

Everything is included.

  • variety of samples
  • health + practical benefits
  • cooking with tempeh
  • troubleshooting on set-ups, ratios, temperature +  humidity
  • tools + books recommendations
  • handouts + recipes
  • a sample of rhizopus spores to make tempeh at home!

“Fermentation is not obsolete and it is not a fad. It is a fact.

It is an inevitable life force that cultures have harnessed to create alcohol; to generate compelling flavours; to preserve food from times of abundance for times of scarcity; to make otherwise toxic plants safe to eat; to increase nutritional value and make food more easily digestible; to sustain health and heal illness; to restore and diversify our microbiota; to conserve and produce energy; and to regenerate soil fertility.”

– Sandor E. Katz

0
    0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop